Now Playing: Red Speedo

The Road Theatre Company Presents

RED SPEEDO

By Lucas Hnath

Directed by Joe Banno

Ray’s swum his way to the eve of the Olympic trials. If he makes the team, he’ll get a deal with Speedo. If he gets a deal with Speedo, he’ll never need a real job. So when someone’s stash of performance-enhancing drugs is found in the locker room fridge, threatening the entire team’s Olympic fate, Ray has to crush the rumors or risk losing everything. A sharp and stylish play about swimming, survival of the fittest, and the American dream of a level playing field—or of leveling the field yourself.

Cast:

Ray – Adam Peltier

Peter – Coronado Romero

Coach – Jason E. Kelley

Lydia – Kimberly Alexander

Assistant Director: Susie Lever

DESIGN TEAM

Scenic Design: Stephen Gifford

Lighting Design: Derrick McDaniel

Sound Design: Chris Moscatiello

Costume Design: Mary Jane Miller

Fight Choreographer: Bjorn Johnson

Property Master: Tally McCormack

Stage Manager: Maurie Gonzalez

ALTERNATE CAST

Ray- Stephen Tyler Howell

Peter- Brian Majestic

Coach- Albie Selznick

Lydia- Lizzy Kimball

RED SPEEDO is produced by Donna Simone Johnson and Maurie Gonzalez

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS!

Shows run Friday and Saturday at 8pm and Sundays at 2pm.

Alternate Cast runs every Thursday night at 8pm

May 31st thru June 28th

RED SPEEDO Cast Interviews

Director Joe Banno

How did you first get involved with Red Speedo?

When Sam (Anderson) sent me the “Speedo” script, the thing that immediately appealed to me was Lucas Hnath’s writing style, with its fragmented, dovetailing dialogue, full of carefully noted hesitations and dramatic silences shared between characters.  I’ve directed (and, as an artistic director, produced) a lot of David Mamet’s plays, and that brand of vividly lifelike, desperately competitive conversation he created can be felt as an influence in Hnath’s style.  But regardless of that legacy, Hnath very much possesses a voice of his own, and these characters he’s created feel fresh and contemporary in very specific – and, yes, topical – ways.

What do you feel was your greatest challenge in directing it?

The biggest challenge in directing the piece was the matter of balance – maintaining equilibrium between all the wonderful polarities in the writing that continually spark off each other:  Wry comedy vs. tense drama, realistic speech vs. an almost musically notated text, high-speed banter vs. ruminative space, a sober reflection on today’s America vs. the trappings of outright satire.

To Read More of This Interview: Click HERE